News & Commentaries

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Abnormalities in a Protein Affecting How Nerve Cells Change Shape May Be Linked to Huntington’s Disease

jhd news

Amsterdam, NL – Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration. In a new study published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease, investigators have discovered that the HD mutation may alter the interactions of Huntingtin, the large protein produced by the HD gene, with Rac1, a protein that directs changes in cell shape.

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Can We Repair the Brain? The Promise of Stem Cell Technologies for Treating Parkinson's Disease

JPD article news
Despite challenges, new advances in stem cell biology and genetic engineering show potential for better cell replacement therapies, say experts in a special supplement to JPD

Amsterdam, NL – Cell replacement may play an increasing role in alleviating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in future. Writing in an open access special supplement the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts describe how newly developed stem cell technologies could be used to treat the disease and discuss the great promise, as well as the significant challenges, of stem cell treatment.

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UMN Medical School Study Provides New Insight Into the Use of Cell Replacement Therapies to Treat Muscular Dystrophies

uni of minnesota news

Minneapolis, MN, USA – The University of Minnesota Medical School continues its legacy of advancing cell replacement therapies with a scientific breakthrough that highlights the promise of cell therapies for muscular dystrophy.

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Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop More Efficient System to Reprogram Stem Cells

mayo clinic news

Rochester, MN, USA – Induced pluripotent stem cells, the workhorse of many regenerative medicine projects, start out as differentiated cells that are reprogrammed to pluripotent stem cells by exposure to a complex set of genetic cocktails. Mayo researchers now report that using the measles virus vector; they’ve trimmed that multi-vector process with four reprogramming factors down to a single “one cycle” vector process. They say the process is safe, stable, faster and usable for clinical translation. The findings appear in the journal Gene Therapy.

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Antibody Could Increase Cure Rate for Blood, Immune Disorders

stanford news
Protein antibody on blood-forming stem cells may allow bone marrow transplants without the need for chemotherapy and radiation

Stanford, CA, USA – An antibody-based treatment can gently and effectively eliminate diseased blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to prepare for the transplantation of healthy stem cells, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Vitamin D and Immune Cells Stimulate Bone Marrow Disease

kobe news

Kobe, Japan – The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments that do not target problem genes. The team was led by Research Fellow Kanako Wakahashi and Junior Associate Professor Yoshio Katayama (Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) and the findings were published on February 4 in the online edition of Blood.

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Folliculin Mutations Disrupt Embryo Implantation

uni of washington news
Folliculin gene defects are implicated in some forms of infertility, certain cancers and other cell growth disorders

Seattle, WA, USA – New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy. As the tiny, dividing cell mass, the blastocyst, travels from the oviduct and lodges in the wall of the uterus, the cells must exit their pre-implantation state and be ready for post-implantation development. Failure of embryos to embed in the uterine lining is a main cause of human infertility. Many pregnancies suddenly stop at this stage, often before the women realize that they had conceived.

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Researchers Develop Human Cell-Based Model to Study Small Cell Lung Cancer

rockefeller news

New York, NY, USA – Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The study, which will be published February 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals the distinct roles played by two critical tumor suppressor genes that are commonly mutated in these highly lethal cancers.

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