News & Commentaries

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New Technique Could Help Regrow Tissue Lost to Periodontal Disease

Washington, DC, USA – According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, in ACS Nano, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue regenerate when implanted into the gums of rats.

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Study Gives New Perspective on Production of Blood Cells and Immune Cells

Study Gives New Perspective on Production of Blood Cells and Immune Cells
Researchers tracked and quantified the production of different kinds of blood cells and immune cells to understand how the body maintains a balanced supply

Santa Cruz, CA, USA – A healthy adult makes about 2 million blood cells every second, and 99 percent of them are oxygen-carrying red blood cells. The other one percent are platelets and the various white blood cells of the immune system. How all the different kinds of mature blood cells are derived from the same "hematopoietic" stem cells in the bone marrow has been the subject of intense research, but most studies have focused on the one percent, the immune cells.

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Oscillation in Muscle Tissue

Oscillation in Muscle Tissue

Berlin, Germany – Muscle stem cells have to be ready to spring into action at any time: When a muscle becomes injured, for example, during a sports activity, it is their responsibility to develop new muscle cells as quickly as possible. When a muscle grows, because its owner is still growing too or has started to do more sports, the conversion of stem cells is also required.

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Cell Therapy Could Replace Need for Kidney Transplants

Winston-Salem, NC, USA – Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are working on a promising approach for treatment of chronic kidney disease – regeneration of damaged tissues using therapeutic cells. By harnessing the unique properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, WFIRM scientists have demonstrated that the cells could potentially help recover organ function in a pre-clinical model of kidney disease.

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Genetically Encoded Sensor Isolates Hidden Leukemic Stem Cells

Genetically Encoded Sensor Isolates Hidden Leukemic Stem Cells
Cells express surface markers that help them escape most targeted therapies, TAU researchers say

Tel Aviv, Israel – All stem cells can multiply, proliferate and differentiate. Because of these qualities, leukemic stem cells are the most malignant of all leukemic cells. Understanding how leukemic stem cells are regulated has become an important area of cancer research. A team of Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have now devised a novel biosensor that can isolate and target leukemic stem cells. The research team, led by Dr. Michael Milyavsky of the Department of Pathology at TAU's Sackler School of Medicine, discuss their unique genetically encoded sensor and its ability to identify, isolate and characterize leukemic stem cells in a study published in Leukemia.

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Making Blood Thicker than Water

Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Making Blood Thicker than Water

Osaka, Japan – The body needs to create a continuous supply of blood cells to enter circulation. Blood cells have a wide variety of functions ranging from supplying oxygen to tissues, fighting infections, and enabling the blood to clot upon injury. Avoiding deficiency of these cells or their excessive proliferation must involve a strict regulatory mechanism, but much remains to be clarified about how this works.

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Utrecht Researchers Develop Mini Kidneys from Urine Cells

Utrecht Researchers Develop Mini Kidneys from Urine Cells

Utrecht, NL – Scientists from the Hubrecht Institute, Princess Máxima Center, Utrecht University and University Medical Center Utrecht have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells. This could lead to a wide range of new treatments that are less onerous for kidney patients. The results of the research were published in Nature Biotechnology.

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