News & Commentaries

Generation of Three-dimensional Heart Organoids

Stembook: Generation of Three-dimensional Heart Organoids

Tokyo, Japan – Heart development as it happens in vivo, or in a living organism, is a complex process that has traditionally been difficult to mimic in vitro, or in the laboratory. In a new study, researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) developed three-dimensional functional heart organoids from mouse embryonic stem cells that closely resemble the developing heart.

Next-gen Organoids Grow and Function Like Real Tissues

Stembook: Next-gen Organoids Grow and Function Like Real Tissues

Lausanne, Switzerland – The EPFL researchers used a laser to sculpt this gut-shaped scaffold within a hydrogel, a soft mix of crosslinked proteins found in the gut’s extracellular matrix supporting the cells in the native tissue. Aside from being the substrate on which the stem cells could grow, the hydrogel thus also provides the form or “geometry” that would build the final intestinal tissue.

New Insight into Mammalian Stem Cell Evolution

Stembook: New Insight into Mammalian Stem Cell Evolution
Scientists are learning about species adaptation by comparing their stem cell-related genes.

Kyoto, Japan – The genes regulating pluripotent stem cells in mammals are surprisingly similar across 48 species, Kyoto University researchers report in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. The study also shows that differences among these ‘gene regulating networks’ might explain how certain features of mammalian pluripotent stem cells have evolved.

Mini-Organs Grown from Patients’ Own Tissue Could Offer Treatment Hope for Children with Intestinal Failure

Stembook: Mini-Organs Grown from Patients’ Own Tissue Could Offer Treatment Hope for Children with Intestinal Failure

London, UK –Pioneering scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) have grown human intestinal grafts using stem cells from patient tissue that could one day lead to personalised transplants for children with intestinal failure, according to a study published in Nature Medicine.

Coaxing Single Stem Cells into Specialized Cells

Stembook: Coaxing Single Stem Cells into Specialized Cells

Chicago, IL, USA – Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. Hydrogel mimics the extracellular matrix – the natural environment of cells in the body

A Village of Cancer Cells

Stembook: A Village of Cancer Cells
UC researchers pinpoint hierarchy of breast cancer cells as potential cause for treatment resistance

Cincinnati, OH, USA – You might have heard the old proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child.” University of Cincinnati instructor Syn Yeo, PhD, thinks the same analogy applies when it comes to cells and the growth of cancer, particularly breast cancer.

Stem Cells Can Repair Parkinson’s-damaged Circuits in Mouse Brains

Stembook: Stem Cells Can Repair Parkinson’s-damaged Circuits in Mouse Brains

Madison, WI, USA – The mature brain is infamously bad at repairing itself following damage like that caused by trauma or strokes, or from degenerative diseases like Parkinson’s. Stem cells, which are endlessly adaptable, have offered the promise of better neural repair. But the brain’s precisely tuned complexity has stymied the development of clinical treatments.

A New Molecular Guardian of Intestinal Stem Cells

Stembook: A New Molecular Guardian of Intestinal Stem Cells

Tokyo, Japan – Intestinal stem cells keep a fine balance between two potential forms: remaining as stem cells, or developing into intestinal epithelial cells. In a new study, researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) discovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates this balance and preserves the stemness of intestinal stem cells—that is, their ability to develop into any intestinal epithelial cell type.

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