News & Commentaries

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ISSCR President Douglas Melton Outlines New Format For the Premier Stem Cell Gathering in 2019

isscr LA 2019

Skokie, IL, USA – Douglas Melton, the President of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) and founding editor of StemBook, outlines in an open letter a new format for the ISSCR Annual Meeting 2019 offering new opportunities and expanded horizons.

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How Sleeping Mammary Stem Cells Are Awakened in Puberty

WEHI news

Melbourne, VIC, Australia – Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty. Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research that was published today in the journal Developmental Cell.

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Helping Blood Cells Regenerate After Radiation Therapy

MIT news

Cambridge, MA, USA – Method boosts differentiation of stem cells into mature blood cell types, may help leukemia and lymphoma patients. Patients with blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma are often treated by irradiating their bone marrow to destroy the diseased cells. After the treatment, patients are vulnerable to infection and fatigue until new blood cells grow back.

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"Cellular Dust" Provides New Hope for Regenerative Medicine

CNRS news

Paris, France – While stem cells have the most therapeutic potential, the benefits of regenerative medicine may best be mobilised using extracellular vesicles (EVs), also known in the past as “cellular dust”. A team of researchers from CNRS, AP-HP, INSERM and Paris Descartes and Paris Diderot Universities have tested these vesicles for the first time in a porcine model for the treatment of post-operative digestive fistulas.

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Tufts Scientists Grow Functioning Human Neural Networks in 3D from Stem Cells

tufts-uni-news

Boston, MA, USA – A team of Tufts University-led researchers has developed three-dimensional (3D) human tissue culture models for the central nervous system that mimic structural and functional features of the brain and demonstrate neural activity sustained over a period of many months. With the ability to populate a 3D matrix of silk protein and collagen with cells from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other conditions, the tissue models allow for the exploration of cell interactions, disease progression and response to treatment.

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Cancer Stem Cells Use “Normal” Genes in Abnormal Ways

colorado news

Denver, CO, USA – CDK1 is a “normal” protein – its presence drives cells through the cycle of replication. And MHC Class I molecules are “normal” as well – they present bits of proteins on the surfaces of cells for examination by the immune system. But a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Cancer Research shows that a population of cancer cells marked by MHC Class I molecules and high CDK1 is anything but normal.

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